Fantasy, middle grade, young adult

Book Review: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling

Title: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Author: JK Rowling
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens
Length: 320 pages, Paperback
Genre: Fantasy, Middle Grade, Young Adult
Rating: 5 folded Pages

Blurb:
Harry Potter, along with his best friends, Ron and Hermione, is about to start his third year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry can’t wait to get back to school after the summer holidays (who wouldn’t if they lived with the horrible Dursleys?) But when Harry gets to Hogwarts, the atmosphere is tense. There’s an escaped mass murderer on the loose, and the sinister prison guards of Azkaban have been called in to guard the school . . .

Review:
I’m finally reaching the point in my Harry Potter reread where it doesn’t feel like Harry is a little too young for me to relate to. The first two books Harry is 11 and 12 and now he’s finally reaching his teen years and matured a bit more reading is going a lot faster. Which is evident in the fact that it took me two days to finish the book.

I’m also enjoying seeing the differences in the book versus the movie. The first two movies are extremely accurate to the book and it’s only in Prisoner of Azkaban that they began having to cut thing to make it more adaptable to the movie format. There were so many things I had forgotten! It’s kind of crazy.

I’m excited to continue my Harry Potter reread and I think it will only get better from here. In my editions of Harry Potter Goblet of Fire is almost exactly double the amount of pages of Prisoner of Azkaban so I think it might take me a little longer to get through but none the less my Harry Potter reread is finally moving along.

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Fantasy, middle grade, young adult

Book Review: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling

Title: Harry Potter and Chamber of Secrets
Author: J.K. Rowling
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens
Length: 256 Pages, Paperback
Genre: Fantasy, Middle Grade, Young Adult
Rating: 5 Folded Pages

Blurb:
The Dursleys were so mean that hideous that summer that all Harry Potter wanted was to get back to the Hogwarts School for Witchcraft and Wizardry. But just as he’s packing his bags, Harry receives a warning from a strange, impish creature named Dobby who says that if Harry Potter returns to Hogwarts, disaster will strike.

And strike it does. For in Harry’s second year at Hogwarts, fresh torments and horrors arise, including an outrageously stuck-up new professor, Gilderoy Lockheart, a spirit named Moaning Myrtle who haunts the girls’ bathroom, and the unwanted attentions of Ron Weasley’s younger sister, Ginny.

But each of these seem minor annoyances when the real trouble begins, and someone–or something–starts turning Hogwarts students to stone. Could it be Draco Malfoy, a more poisonous rival than ever? Could it possibly be Hagrid, whose mysterious past is finally told? Or could it be the one everyone at Hogwarts most suspects…Harry Potter himself?

Review:
I know, it took me FOREVER to reread this one. I think it was partly my slump and partly because it’s a little hard for me to read middle grade novels these days even if it’s a novel I love. Pre-reading slump, every word of every novel felt really difficult. Especially of novels that felt too young for me like Harry Potter sometimes does.

However, continuing the Chamber of Secrets after my reading slump was absolutely delightful. I had a hard time putting it down. I forgot how quickly Harry Potter novels progress once you get passed the beginning.

I’m not really sure what else to say. I had a great time rereading this (once I got over my slump) and I’ve already started The Prisoner of Azkaban. I can’t wait to continue rereading this series. I think as I get further into my reread of the series the books will be easier for me to digest because as Harry ages you can see the maturity and character development. I love that about these books.

 

Fantasy, middle grade, young adult

Book Review: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

hp philosopher's stone

Title: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone
Author: J.K. Rowling
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens
Length: 224, paperback
Genre: Fantasy, Middle Grade, Young Adult
Rating: HOW DO YOU RATE HARRY POTTER – ahem – 5 Folded Pages

Blurb:
Harry Potter thinks he is an ordinary boy. He lives with his Uncle Vernon, Aunt Petunia and cousin Dudley, who are mean to him and make him sleep in a cupboard under the stairs. (Dudley, however, has two bedrooms, one to sleep in and one for all his toys and games.) Then Harry starts receiving mysterious letters and his life is changed forever. He is whisked away by a beetle-eyed giant of a man and enrolled at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The reason: Harry Potter is a wizard!

Review:
Harry Potter is so iconic that I can’t begin to legitimately review it. Instead this will be insight I gain from rereading the book and a comparison to what I remember of it. This will be very spoilery because I highly doubt there are people who don’t know what happens in Harry Potter even if it’s only from the movies.

Everytime I reread Harry Potter I learn something new both about myself and the books. It’s been a good two years since my last reread. Last time I reread The Philosopher’s Stone I was highly annoyed with the writing. I didn’t think I’d be able to make it through the book. It read too young for me. This time, however, the book was perfect.

I don’t know what’s changed with me between now and then but I know something has because I thoroughly enjoyed my reread. I’m already half way through Chamber of Secrets as I’m writing this one and I’m so glad I’ve chosen to reread the series at this juncture in my life.

Harry Potter is the series that got me into reading. Actually, I hated reading when I was young. It felt tedious and I wondered why people enjoyed it so much. I was almost held back in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade because I refused to read.

One day during SSR (sustained silent reading) in fifth grade, I picked up Harry Potter because everyone seemed to be reading it and wanted to know what the fuss was all about. Suddenly I knew why everyone loved to read. I read books 1-5 in about 5 months which was miraclous to my teacher considering how she fought with me before this.

Enough with the reminiscing though, I really enjoyed this reread and I can’t wait to continue rereading the series.